fires

Burn Terrestrial Data
Title Abstract
Anaktuvuk River fire scar canopy reflectance spectra from the 2008-2014 growing seasons, North Slope Alaska.
The Anaktuvuk River Fire occurred in 2007 on the North Slope of Alaska. In 2008, three eddy covariance towers were established at sites represent ing unburned tundra, moderately burned tundra, and severely burned tundra. During the 2008-2014 growing seasons, canopy vegetation within the footprint of each of these towers was scanned with a handheld spectrophotometer several times throughout the growing season. Average reflectance spectra per site and collection day are presented here.
Anaktuvuk River fire scar eriophorum vaginatum flowering during the 2008-2014 growing seasons
The Anaktuvuk River Fire occurred in 2007 on the North Slope of Alaska. In 2008, three eddy covariance towers were established at sites representing unburned tundra, moderately burned tundra, and severely burned tundra. Eriophorum vaginatum flowers were counted from annual photographs of each site during peak flowering season (6/17-7/20).
Thermokarst Streams
Title Abstract
ARCSS/TK stream dissolved organic carbon biodegradability (2011).
The (ARCSSTK) did extensive research during 2009-2011 field seasons in Arctic Alaska. The objective of this data set was to measure the quantity and biodegradability of DOC from headwater streams and rivers across three geographic regions and across four natural ‘treatments’ (reference; thermokarst-; burned-, and thermokarst + burned-impacted streams) to evaluate which factors most strongly influence DOC quantity and biodegradablity at a watershed scale.
Modeling
Title Abstract
Long-term changes in tundra carbon balance following wildfire, climate change and potential nutrient addition, a modeling analysis.
A study investigating the mechanisms that control long-term response of tussock tundra to fire and to increases in air temperature, CO2, nitrogen deposition and phosphorus weathering. The MBL MEL was used to simulate the recovery of three types of tussock tundra, unburned, moderately burned, and severely burned in response to changes in climate and nutrient additions. The simulations indicate that the recovery of nutrients lost during wildfire is difficult under a warming climate because... more
Thermokarst
Title Abstract
Physical site characteristics for the ARCSS/TK stream dissolved organic carbon biodegradability (2011) data set.
The (ARCSSTK) did extensive research during 2009-2011 field seasons in Arctic Alaska. The objective of this data set was to measure the quantity and biodegradability of DOC from headwater streams and rivers across three geographic regions and across four natural ‘treatments’ (reference; thermokarst-; burned-, and thermokarst + burned-impacted streams) to evaluate which factors most strongly influence DOC quantity and biodegradablity at a watershed scale. This table provides physical site... more
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